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To go after 'Urban Naxals' is a futile endeavour. The government needs to direct its resources better.
The right-wing catchphrase "Urban Naxal" that is being used to discredit anti-establishment voices in India finds great relevance in the country's main anti-terror law.
The newly-formed cabinet of Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has several establishment faces with close links to India.
Till the division, there were more Bengali speakers in Assam than Assamese speakers.
The speech generated a huge controversy in April 2002, a month after the calamitous communal riots in Gujarat, India.
Xi Jinping is hardly the eternal, invincible mega-leader that the West has understood him to be.
The recent protests over road safety in Bangladesh after the death of two young students in Dhaka were a blunt expression of popular anger against an apathetic administration.
Pakistan's new prime minister and former cricketer, Imran Khan, has spoken of rapprochement with India in his victory speech. Should India believe him?
The ban on cow slaughter in India has a complex past and a violent present.
Can radical politics harbor a deadening conservatism?